Monday, June 19, 2017

PODCAST REVIEW: The Worn & Wound Podcast

It's no secret that today's media is as fractured as it comes. There are literally hundreds of ways to fill the hours with entertainment tailored exactly to your interests and attention span. Gone are the days when the whole world tuned into one television show like the finale of M*A*S*H in 1983.

Nowadays, the name of the game is personalized content. This means that you don't have to watch a show or listen to a program because it is the only thing on right now. In fact, most media today seems to be available on-demand allowing you to enjoy it whenever and wherever you want.

As a new series on the Watch Hunter blog, I am going to review some of best watch-related content on the internet. Even if you were able to stay up 24 hours a day and watch YouTube, read blogs and listen to podcasts, you would never ever be able to do it all... believe me, I have tried (and lost hours of sleep). This means that you have to be selective.

Image: Worn & Wound web site
My first review is about the relatively new podcast series by some of the best watch reviewers on the planet. The fine fellows at Worn & Wound have been reviewing affordable watches since 2011... and they arguably do it better than anyone else. Why is this? If I had to narrow it down, I would say that they have the attention to detail that many other reviewers lack, and they have the discipline to tell you only what you need to know. More on this later...

First things first. If you do not know what a podcast is, then let me enlighten you. A podcasts is audio content that can be published by anyone with a recording device. The subject matter can be anything from politics to hobbies. Usually the format allows greater in-depth discussion because they are not limited in time.

Podcasts can be played on devices from computers to smartphones and listeners can subscribe to be alerted about the latest episodes. You can also listen to older content, which can be helpful if you missed an episode. You can subscribe at Apple iTunes, GooglePlay and Stitcher and the content is absolutely free for the taking.

Podcasts are ideal for our busy modern lifestyle where everyone seems to be doing 3 things at once. If you take public transportation or have a long commute to work, a podcast can be a welcome distraction from the daily bad news on the airwaves.

It is hard to believe, but the Worn & Wound podcasts are a relatively new offering with the first episode appearing as Basel World coverage in March of 2017. I'm mentioning this because new listeners have roughly 738 minutes within 15 episodes of watch talk at their fingertips as of today (with more added weekly). While this may seem overwhelming if you are just digging in, it shouldn't be. Every episode is clearly described so you can cherry pick the episodes that interest you.

The growing list of podcasts available on Apple iTunes.
Remember my comment about Worn & Wound's attention to detail and discipline? This pays huge dividends for the listeners who tune in because Zach, Ilya, Blake, Mark and their guests do not waste your time. These guys stay on topic and explore it until it is fully baked, but not overcooked.

By contrast, there is nothing worse than suffering through a horological podcast that rambles with seemingly no purpose or respect for the audience's time. I tried a few other unnamed watch-related podcasts and could not get past the reviewer's verbal diarrhea and senseless banter. To these offenders I say "Dear windbags! Please edit your stream-of-consciousness muttering to actual relevant material. We do not care about what you did over the weekend or want to hear about some restaurant you tried.  It is a waste of our time." Like all the superhero movies say "With great power comes great responsibility." ha ha

You can see the content of the podcast if you want to listen to select episodes
Speaking of time, most of the Worn & Wound podcasts come in at just under one hour. The Worn & Wound team picks a topic of their choosing and analyzes it from all angles. What distinguishes these discussions is the laser sharp focus on the details concerning watch design, micro-brands, manufacturing, and what constitutes good value in the segment of "affordable watches" under $2,000. The W&W podcasts offer a lot a breadth of subject matter so I am only mentioning a few of the things that have been covered so far.

However, you never know what will be on upcoming shows. I suspect that it must be a bit of a monumental task to line up interesting guests or tape an hour long show each week. Listeners can be part of the show too by sending in their questions. I was lucky enough to have two of mine answered on one show. It was great to get an on-air response and it made me feel like I was part of the show. If you have a question that you want answered, just sent it to them.


I think of these Worn & Wound podcasts as the equivalent to being a "fly on the wall" listening to highly knowledgeable experts discuss our shared watch collecting obsession with passion, wit and accurate knowledge. You will never hear them say something as stupid as "Grand Seikos are garbage," which is an actual paraphrased quote from another person's podcast I listened to once. The worst you might hear is them making fun of Depeche Mode's brand ambassadorship with Hublot... but hey, nobody is perfect (including that watch). ha ha.

The Worn & Wound podcast series does not repeat content that is seen in the Worn & Wound YouTube channel or on their best-of-class watch reviews. Think of their podcasts as extended content that you might get with a BluRay of your favorite Hollywood movie. In a sense, it is like talking watches while sipping a single malt whiskey with the same trusted watch reviewers who you have read for years. These writers have shared their knowledge and shaped our opinions on what it is to be a watch collector. I can think of at least 2 watches that I own because of a Watch & Worn review... and I guarantee that I am not alone in that demographic. I am thankful that Worn & Wound is branching out  into the medium of podcasts and doing it with the same professionalism seen in their other content.

I can honestly say that listening to a Worn & Wound podcast is like eating a giant perfectly grilled homemade hamburger. You know, the ones with all the fixings that don't fit into the bun unlike the skimpy burgers they sell at Mickey D's. Worn & Wound's content has more beef and less filler than the competitive podcasts (If you are vegan, then just substitute the beef analogy for a delicious portobello mushroom). Regardless, if you start listening to the Worn & Wound podcasts now, you might catch up faster than you think... especially if you binge listen! Give them a listen. You won't regret it.

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